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Joseph Grijalva Section:  5

4/27/05

The Things That I Would Say Final CM

 

            Anyone who has ever been a teenager (which is everyone) has probably had some time in their life when they have wanted to tell their parents something but know that they must not.  For instance, I once wanted to spend the night and my friend’s house, but my parents would not allow me to.  I believed their reason for not allowing me to stay was ridiculous and grew angry.  Yet I knew that I could not tell them what I wanted too.  At the time I was more worried about getting into trouble than anything else.  Now I realize that I would have hurt my parents if I had told them what I had wished to say.  Also, I now realize that what I had been feeling was not truthful.  Now that the event has passed I see that my parents were only looking out for my best interests, not trying to keep me from doing something that I wanted to do. 

            Poems such as “Please listen” as well as my own, help to remind the reader that it is much easier to speak than it is to remain silent.  Someone who knows when he or she cannot solve a problem has is much wiser than the person who tries to spout advice in situations that he or she has no experience in.  We also need to remember that one word spoken in error can be far more powerful than one word spoken in truth.  Most people probably find that an insult is much easier to remember than a compliment.  As Ecclesiastes 3-9 says, “There is an appointed time for everything, and a time for every affair under the heavens.”  We know that a right time exists to say everything; our job is to practice restraint until these times present themselves.